Tag: race

socioeconomic status

This study confirms previous reports of rates of asthma during pregnancy in the range of 0.4% to 1.3% (Table 2). It also demonstrates that rates of asthma during pregnancy are racially disparate, with African Americans and Hispanics at greater risk than whites. Furthermore, women with Medicaid and Medicaid Healthstart are at greater risk for asthma during pregnancy than are women with indemnity insurance. In a multivariable model, insurance status appears to explain much of the racial disparity in asthma during pregnancy. As mentioned earlier, insurance status provides a surrogate measure of socioeconomic status and access to medical care. This finding is consistent with the model of

…Read the rest of this article

Descriptive Characteristics of the Study Population

Only the racial/ethnic groups of non-Hispanic whites (n=337,130), non-Hispanic African Americans (n= 102,129), and Hispanics (n=80,898) were used for the analyses presented in this report. Those with other race/ethnicity (n=36,440,6.6% of the study population) were excluded from the analyses because of their heterogeneity. The characteristics of the study population are displayed in Table 1. Higher percentages of African-American and Hispanic mothers were under the age of 25 years, as compared to white mothers. African-American and Hispanic mothers were more likely than whites to have less than 12 years of education, to have Medicaid as their primary source of medical insurance, or to lack healthcare coverage. African-American and Hispanic mothers were more likely than whites to receive inadequate or no prenatal care and had higher rates of initiating prenatal care in the second or third trimesters.

…Read the rest of this article

The methods used have been described in part elsewhere but are summarized here. The data for this historical cohort study were obtained from an administrative database that contains linked birth certificate, infant death certificate, and maternal and newborn hospital discharge claims data for the delivery hospitalization for all singleton, live births to New Jersey residents in New Jersey hospitals during 1989-1993 (N=556,597). Ninety-five percent of births were successfully linked back to the birth certificate data. The mother’s and infant’s hospital discharge data contain information extracted from discharge summaries of their delivery hospitalizations.

…Read the rest of this article

pregnancy

INTRODUCTION

Asthma is a chronic disease affecting between nine-and 12 million persons in the United States. It is the most frequent respiratory disorder complicating pregnancy, affecting 0.4-1.3% of pregnant women. There is a demonstrated association between inadequately controlled asthma during pregnancy and adverse infant and maternal outcomes, and there is considerable evidence that achieving good medical control of asthma during pregnancy reduces these risks.

…Read the rest of this article

disparities

Numerous published reports have documented ethnic differences in the receipt and outcomes of care between African-American and Caucasian patients in a variety of settings. Many of these studies have been based upon administrative data relating to hospitalization. This analysis represents one of the few attempts to investigate the existence of such differences in the primary care setting using data collected directly from patients. We found that African Americans with ischemic heart disease had higher levels of self-reported risk factors for ischemic heart disease, such as smoking, diabetes and hypertension but reported having received fewer cardiac procedures. Surprisingly, however, African Americans reported better physical function, vitality, and angina stability than Caucasians—a difference that persisted after adjustment for socioeconomic covariates and stratification by site. We also observed lower scores on the mental health scales of the SF-36 among African Americans compared with Caucasians, but these differences did not persist consistently across sites after adjustment. Notably, African Americans reported significantly lower satisfaction with the care for their IHD compared to Caucasian patients, and these differences persisted at half of our sites after adjustment.

…Read the rest of this article

At enrollment into ACQUIP, the health-screening questionnaire was sent to 55,222 patients, of whom 32,149 were Caucasian and 12,816 were African-American. A total of 31,360 were returned, including 10,385 Caucasian and African-American patients, who reported ischemic heart disease and were sent the SAQ. Responses were received from 7,985 of these patients, of whom 6,704 (84.0%) were Caucasian and 1,281 (16.0%) were African-American. The percentage of African-American respondents at sites А, В, C, D, E, and F was 18% (of 1,377), 10% (of 2,429), 27% (of 1,289), 17% (of 548), 7% (of 1,715) and 37% (of 627), respectively.

…Read the rest of this article

Design

We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected as part of the Ambulatory Care Quality Improvement Project (ACQUIP). ACQUIP was a multicenter, group-randomized trial designed to determine whether health outcomes and satisfaction with care could be improved by giving primary care providers access to regular, systematic assessments of their patients’ health and functional status, combined with routine clinical data and information regarding practice guidelines.

…Read the rest of this article